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South Australian Seed Conservation Centre

Seed hunter Dan Duval collects seeds in an arid zone of South Australia. Photo: SA Seed Conservation Centre
Seed hunter Dan Duval collects seeds in an arid zone of South Australia
Photo: SA Seed Conservation Centre
    The nationally endangered Corunna daisy (Brachyscome muelleri) has been collected, stored and researched at the South Australian Seed Conservation Centre. Photo: SA Seed Conservation Centre
The nationally endangered Corunna daisy (Brachyscome muelleri) has been collected, stored and researched at the South Australian Seed Conservation Centre
Photo: SA Seed Conservation Centre
    Dr Leanne Pound tests the ability of seeds to germinate at different temperatures in an effort to understand the potential impact of climate change on threatened native plants. Photo: SA Seed Conservation Centre
Dr Leanne Pound tests the ability of seeds to germinate at different temperatures in an effort to understand the potential impact of climate change on threatened native plants
Photo: SA Seed Conservation Centre

The South Australian Seed Conservation Centre is based at the Botanic Gardens of South Australia. The primary objective of the Centre is to collect seed from priority plant species throughout South Australia. The seed will be used to establish long-term seed conservation collections, and to develop germination and storage protocols for each species. 

As a partner in the Australian Seed Bank Partnership, the Centre contributes extensive knowledge, experience and resources. The South Australian Seed Conservation Centre:

  • collects, processes and stores native seeds for conservation purposes
  • researches seed biology to improve germination
  • partners with others to restore native plant communities.

Leadership | Website [external link]

OUR STORIES

Seed hunter Thai Te collects seeds from the Tarcoola pea
Posted: 02 May 2011

Seed hunters from the Adelaide Botanic Gardens have rediscovered a native pea that has not been seen in outback Australia for nearly 60 years.

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